Pop-up Case Studies

Digital Pop-Up

Digital pop-up was designed and deployed in collaboration with the City of Willoughby. The aim of the project was to obtain community feedback around Council services and the implementation of infrastructure that encouraged health lifestyles. 

 

Three variations of the interactive pop-up was designed, which was deployed over several days. This consisted of: (1) a tablet device with a customised yes/no voting web interface used in conjunction with an existing urban screen; (2) an unstaffed pop-up using a tablet device – with an adapted web interface that allowed participants to type text responses, the urban screen, market umbrella, synthetic turf and barstools; and (3) a staffed pop-up using the same tablet device with web interface, the urban screen, gazebo structure, synthetic grass, seating, plants, and ‘call to action’ signage, which was displayed on the urban screen and on physical posters at the pop-up.

 

Across three deployments over 300 people interacted with various pop-up installations. People provided their feedback around Council services and desired infrastructure to encourage healthy lifestyles. The results of the study informed the Councils future strategy for healthy lifestyles.

Tree's Pop-Up

The Tree’s pop-up was developed to obtain community feedback around the Ausgrid vegetation management program. Held across four diverse Sydney locations, the events were used to obtain community feedback around tree trimming and powerlines.Tree trimming and vegetation removal performed around powerlines and power poles can often be a contentious issue in local communities. 

 

Adopting a human-centred approach and employing design thinking methods, several design workshops were facilitated to test the proposed engagement activities with industry professionals and community members. This creative approach enabled participants to provide feedback around the design of the engagement activities and input into the wider engagement program. Three effective engagement activities were developed and placed within a pop-up and each location. This included:

 

A selfie voting app, where participants could answer yes/no questions by taking a selfie in front of a fabricated tree. The same yes/no questions printed as physical media in the form of a paper leaf, which were then placed on a second fabricated tree. A tree game, using augmented reality where users could see virtual powerlines and trees by looking through Google Cardboard augmented reality goggles and using customised tracking markers to move the virtual objects around the physical space.

 

Across four locations over 150 people interacted at the community engagement events. People provided their feedback around vegetation management, which was then presented back to Ausgrid as a detailed report. The insights and recommendations from the engagement program enabled Ausgrid to make the required changes to better manage tree trimming within local communities.

Pop-Spot

Pop-Spot was an architecturally designed pop-up installation within The University of Sydney. The objective of this study was to obtain feedback from staff and students around transport infrastructure on and around the university campus.

 

Adopting a human-centred approach and employing design thinking methods, several design workshops were conducted to test the proposed engagement activities with industry professionals and community members. This creative approach enabled participants to provide feedback around the design of the engagement program and the proposed features within the pop-up. The pop-up incorporated five thematically themed engagement activities consisting of digital, physical and mechanical media channels. 

 

The engagement activities included: (1) an analogue display with a large transparent screen; (2) a selfie voting app which allowed people to answer an engagement question by picking up a picture representing a mode of transport, and taking a selfie; (3) an interactive 40-inch multi-touch screen, which provided a visual representation of selfies taken on the selfie voting app; (4) chalk stencils, representing modes of transport, drawn on the ground adjacent to the booth, to display the cumulative results of responses submitted via the selfie voting app; (5) a static chalkboard where people were able to provide feedback through freehand drawing and writing. 

 

Across the two week deployment over 400 people interacted with the bespoke pop-up. People provided their feedback around transport options. The results of the study were disseminated in several academic publications and results were presented back to the university.